27.7.17

Sperm counts in the West plunge by 60% as ‘modern life’ damages men’s health

Sperm counts have plunged by nearly 60 per cent in just 40 years among men living in the West, according to a major review of scientific studies that suggests the modern world is causing serious damage to men’s health.

Pesticides, hormone-disrupting chemicals, diet, stress, smoking and obesity have all been “plausibly associated” with the problem, which is associated with a range of other illnesses such as testicular cancer and a generally increased mortality rate.



The researchers who carried out the review said the rate of decline had showed no sign of “levelling off” in recent years.

The same trend was not seen in other parts of the world such as South America, Africa and Asia, although the scientists said fewer studies had been carried out there.

One expert commenting on the study said it was the “most comprehensive to date”, and described the figures as “shocking” and a “wake-up call” for urgent research into the reasons driving the fall.

Writing in the journal Human Reproduction Update, the researchers – from Israel, the US, Denmark, Brazil and Spain – said total sperm count had fallen by 59.3 per cent between 1971 and 2011 in Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. Sperm concentration fell by 52.4 per cent.

“Sperm count and other semen parameters have been plausibly associated with multiple environmental influences, including endocrine disrupting chemicals, pesticides, heat and lifestyle factors, including diet, stress, smoking and body-mass index,” the paper said.

“Therefore, sperm count may sensitively reflect the impacts of the modern environment on male health throughout the life course.”

Chemicals linked to lowering sperm count include some used to make plastics more flexible and flame retardants used in furniture. These can enter the food chain after they are taken in by plants or eaten by animals.

A diet high in alcohol, caffeine, processed meat, soy and potatoes may also have an adverse effect on male fertility.

Aside from the obvious implications for reproduction, the researchers said the declines were consistent with reported trends in testicular cancer, the number of children born with one or both testicles missing, the onset of male puberty and total testosterone levels.

“The public health implications are even wider. Recent studies have shown that poor sperm count is associated with overall morbidity and mortality,” they added.

They called for urgent work to find out the reasons behind the decline, noting a few possible candidates.

“While the current study is not designed to provide direct information on the causes of the observed declines, sperm count has been plausibly associated with multiple environmental and lifestyle influences, both prenatally and in adult life,” the scientists said.

“In particular, endocrine disruption from chemical exposures or maternal smoking during critical windows of male reproductive development may play a role in prenatal life, while lifestyle changes and exposure to pesticides may play a role in adult life.

“Thus, a decline in sperm count might be considered as a ‘canary in the coal mine’ for male health across the lifespan. Our report of a continuing and robust decline should, therefore, trigger research into its causes, aiming for prevention.”

One of the team, Professor Shanna Swan, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, said falling sperm counts had been “of great concern” since they were first noticed about 25 years ago.

She added: “This definitive study shows, for the first time, that this decline is strong and continuing.

“The fact that the decline is seen in Western countries strongly suggests that chemicals in commerce are playing a causal role in this trend.”

Professor Daniel Brison, an expert in clinical embryology at Manchester University who was not involved in the review, said the study’s large size meant any debate about whether the decline was happening was probably over.

He said by including a large number of studies from around the world the researchers had been able to “confirm that the decline in sperm counts is likely to be ‘real’”.

Look up xenoestrogens - a foreign estrogen that has been linked to all sorts of different things in men (though none are definitively proven yet) such as feminists traits, homosexuality, cancer, etc.

Check out this documentary called "visit this link The Disappearing Male"

There have also been a lot of alarming stories reported about xenoestrogens – manmade chemicals that are present in everything from weedkillers and food preservatives to make-up – which may be responsible for everything from increasing breast size and the early onset of puberty in girls to causing males to develop female sexual characteristics. They may yet be revealed to have wreaked havoc on the biology of the human race in the imminent future, but right now there's apparently not enough conclusive proof to say either way.

Dr Ian Fentiman is professor of surgical oncology at Guy's, King's and St Thomas' School of Medicine in London. His main area of research is breast cancer, so he's studied the effects of xenoestrogens because, yes, they've been implicated in the development of that disease, too. "There's little direct evidence but lots of indirect evidence that xenoestrogens have an oestrogenic effect and affect the growth of human breast cancer cells; but to take that on and say what the impact of this is on human females, well, it's a wee bit more difficult to say," says Dr Fentiman. "We're doing some work which seems to show that you can see evidence in relatively young women that they've had exposure to a variety of mutagens and the body has had a response to those. It may be that if you get an exposure to xenoestrogens at a young age there may be an even more profound effect. The young breast is very sensitive to a whole variety of stimuli. But none of it is yet proven."

MIDUFINGA

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